ERAS News and Announcements

Planning for Residency Interviews

 The residency application process is a significant turning point on your path to medicine, and a busy and stressful period for you and your peers. Unfortunately, due to the competitive nature of securing a residency, some applicants engage in counter-productive behaviors, such as:

  • Believing they must immediately respond to interview offers to secure interview opportunities before others do or risk ending up waitlisted.
  • Applying to too many programs, even those in which they are not genuinely interested “just in case.”
  • Accepting all interviews offered, even with programs they are not genuinely interested in, those that overlap and/or conflict with other interviews the applicant has already secured, and even if accepting the interview would result in an unrealistically packed interview schedule.
  • Canceling a scheduled interview too late for other applicants to take advantage of the opening. While canceling an interview at the last minute may seem inconsequential to the applicant, it can cause other applicants to be eliminated from interviewing at their first choice of program, puts waitlisted applicants in the position of having to incur last minute travel expenses, and deeply inconveniences the residency programs.
  •  Missing class, skipping and leaving rotations, remaining glued to a phone, or asking family or friends monitor their email and accept all interviews offered, even if they overlap and/or conflict with other interviews the applicant has already secured.
  • Taking excessive time away from academic assignments to attend a disproportionate number of interviews.

In addition, to make the best use of your time, energy and attention during interview season we recommend that you use these best practices:

  • Determine the maximum number of residency interviews you can reasonably attend, and either don’t accept additional interviews or promptly cancel any interview that exceeds that maximum.
  • Communicate with programs as soon as possible should you need to cancel an interview out of respect to the residency program and other applicants; there are very few acceptable excuses for not attending an interview.

The AAMC offers a number resources to help you apply smart and plan for the residency interview process, including these from Careers in Medicine:

AAMC Statement on President Trump’s Immigration Proclamation
 

AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges) President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, MD, issued the following statement regarding President Trump’s proclamation on immigration:

“The September 24, 2017 proclamation eases restrictions on individuals from most of the previously affected countries who hold visas commonly used for medical education and training, and includes education, professional training, and urgent medical need as potential grounds for waivers.  These international exchanges benefit the health security of all U.S. citizens.

However, highly qualified aspiring and practicing physicians and scientists may still face barriers to entry, including potentially inconsistent waiver decisions. To address this concern, medical schools and teaching hospitals urge the administration to make categorical exceptions for medical students, medical residents, physicians, and scientists as well as those attending medical and scientific conferences in the United States.”

Pediatric Cardiology (Pediatrics)-New Recruitment Cycle

ERAS is pleased to announce, Pediatric Cardiology (Pediatrics) programs will transition from the 18 month December ERAS application cycle to the 12 month July ERAS application cycle for fellows who will begin their training in July 2019.

Pediatric Hematology/Oncology-New Recruitment Cycle

ERAS is pleased to announce, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (Pediatrics) programs will transition from the 18 month December ERAS application cycle to the 12 month July ERAS application cycle for fellows who will begin their training in July 2019.

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