General MCAT FAQs

What will be new in the 2018 testing year?

In 2018, Pearson VUE will begin administering the MCAT exam. Because AAMC is changing its test delivery vendor, testing locations in 2018 will necessarily differ from those in the past.

 

While the vast majority of test centers are in convenient locations, a small number of students will need to travel farther than they did in the past. Many of these locations are in remote places previously served by university-based centers. Because of  newer technical capabilities and to provide a consistent testing experience for examinees, we will not be administering the MCAT exam at university-based or other third-party sites.

 

Please note that five dates have been added to the 2018 schedule (an increase from 25 to 30) and the majority of testing dates have been placed on Fridays and Saturdays.

 

When the testing year concludes, we will study examinees’ experiences with the 2018 dates and locations, and we will evaluate potential technical solutions that might allow us to consider university-based sites. We will use these data and this information to make plans for 2019 and beyond.

 

Also new for 2018, the AAMC is making enhancements to the way the MCAT exam interface looks, feels, and functions on test day. These enhancements include more user-friendly features, including higher screen resolution, clearer font type and size, and keyboard shortcuts that can be used during the exam. These updates will be made beginning with the 2018 testing year.

 

Please note, the content and skills tested and the order of the exam sections will remain the same.

 

In mid-December 2017, all AAMC practice materials will be automatically updated to reflect the new exam interface. We encourage you to save at least one of the starts on your practice products, so that you can try out the new interface. In addition, a free tool will also be made available in December for you to preview and practice interacting with the new interface so that you know what to expect on test day.

What will be new in the 2018 testing year?

In 2018, Pearson VUE will begin administering the MCAT exam. Because AAMC is changing its test delivery vendor, testing locations in 2018 will necessarily differ from those in the past.

 

While the vast majority of test centers are in convenient locations, a small number of students will need to travel farther than they did in the past. Many of these locations are in remote places previously served by university-based centers. Because of  newer technical capabilities and to provide a consistent testing experience for examinees, we will not be administering the MCAT exam at university-based or other third-party sites.

 

Please note that five dates have been added to the 2018 schedule (an increase from 25 to 30) and the majority of testing dates have been placed on Fridays and Saturdays.

 

When the testing year concludes, we will study examinees’ experiences with the 2018 dates and locations, and we will evaluate potential technical solutions that might allow us to consider university-based sites. We will use these data and this information to make plans for 2019 and beyond.

 

Also new for 2018, the AAMC is making enhancements to the way the MCAT exam interface looks, feels, and functions on test day. These enhancements include more user-friendly features, including higher screen resolution, clearer font type and size, and keyboard shortcuts that can be used during the exam. These updates will be made beginning with the 2018 testing year.

 

Please note, the content and skills tested and the order of the exam sections will remain the same.

 

In mid-December 2017, all AAMC practice materials will be automatically updated to reflect the new exam interface. We encourage you to save at least one of the starts on your practice products, so that you can try out the new interface. In addition, a free tool will also be made available in December for you to preview and practice interacting with the new interface so that you know what to expect on test day.

Am I eligible to take the MCAT Exam?

You are eligible to take the MCAT exam if you are planning to apply to a health professions school, which includes:

  • M.D.-granting programs
  • D.O.-granting programs
  • Podiatric (D.P.M)
  • Veterinary medicine (D.V.M)
  • Any other health-related program that will accept MCAT Examresults to satisfy a test score admissions requirement

When you register, you will be required to a statement verifying your intention to apply to a health professions school.

International Students

There are no additional eligibility requirements for international examinees. If you are in or hold an MBBS degree program, you can register for the exam without seeking special permission.

For more information, please read How Do I Apply as an International Applicant? 

Special Permission

If you aren’t planning to apply to a health professions school or if you’re a currently enrolled medical student (other than a MBBS degree program), you must obtain "special permission" to register for the MCAT exam.

To request special permission, please send an email to mcat@aamc.org, stating the reason(s) you wish to take the exam. The MCAT exam office will attempt to review and respond to your request within five business days, although during certain times we may be delayed in our ability to reply within this time frame. We therefore ask that you be mindful of registration deadlines, because staff cannot extend closing dates for any reason.

Am I eligible to take the MCAT Exam?

You are eligible to take the MCAT exam if you are planning to apply to a health professions school, which includes:

  • M.D.-granting programs
  • D.O.-granting programs
  • Podiatric (D.P.M)
  • Veterinary medicine (D.V.M)
  • Any other health-related program that will accept MCAT Examresults to satisfy a test score admissions requirement

When you register, you will be required to a statement verifying your intention to apply to a health professions school.

International Students

There are no additional eligibility requirements for international examinees. If you are in or hold an MBBS degree program, you can register for the exam without seeking special permission.

For more information, please read How Do I Apply as an International Applicant? 

Special Permission

If you aren’t planning to apply to a health professions school or if you’re a currently enrolled medical student (other than a MBBS degree program), you must obtain "special permission" to register for the MCAT exam.

To request special permission, please send an email to mcat@aamc.org, stating the reason(s) you wish to take the exam. The MCAT exam office will attempt to review and respond to your request within five business days, although during certain times we may be delayed in our ability to reply within this time frame. We therefore ask that you be mindful of registration deadlines, because staff cannot extend closing dates for any reason.

When should I take the MCAT exam?

The best time to take the MCAT exam is when you feel most prepared and ready. There isn’t a “one size fits all” solution that will work for everyone. But when making this decision, there are three questions you can ask yourself:

 

1. When do I want to attend medical school?
Often, students will choose to take their MCAT exam in the same year they are applying to medical school. For example, if you are thinking about attending medical school in fall 2019, you might consider taking your exam during 2018. 

 

2. Is there a potential I will need to test more than once?
There are many examinees who test more than once. If you think you may re-take the exam, and you want to leave yourself that option, you may think about taking the exam earlier in a testing year. This will give you the opportunity to receive your scores, make a decision about whether to re-test or not, and find another seat on a preferred date and location later in the year.

 

3. Have I mastered the content tested on the exam?
The MCAT exam tests content found in introductory-level courses at most undergraduate institutions, including biology, general and organic chemistry, and physics, as well as first-semester biochemistry, psychology, and sociology. While there aren’t specific courses you have to take to be able to register and take the exam, it’s important to feel comfortable with the content and skills tested. If you feel that additional coursework or studying is needed to help you prepare, think about testing at a later point in the year to have additional time. Consult your pre-health advisor or a faculty member to assist with course selection, as courses vary by institution.

 

Also keep in mind, medical schools will be able to see all of your scores and there are now limits on the number of times you can take the exam. See the MCAT Essentials for more information about releasing scores and lifetime limits.

 

If you need help deciding when to take the exam, check in with your pre-health advisor. Most importantly, take the exam when you’re ready, not when you think should be.

When should I take the MCAT exam?

The best time to take the MCAT exam is when you feel most prepared and ready. There isn’t a “one size fits all” solution that will work for everyone. But when making this decision, there are three questions you can ask yourself:

 

1. When do I want to attend medical school?
Often, students will choose to take their MCAT exam in the same year they are applying to medical school. For example, if you are thinking about attending medical school in fall 2019, you might consider taking your exam during 2018. 

 

2. Is there a potential I will need to test more than once?
There are many examinees who test more than once. If you think you may re-take the exam, and you want to leave yourself that option, you may think about taking the exam earlier in a testing year. This will give you the opportunity to receive your scores, make a decision about whether to re-test or not, and find another seat on a preferred date and location later in the year.

 

3. Have I mastered the content tested on the exam?
The MCAT exam tests content found in introductory-level courses at most undergraduate institutions, including biology, general and organic chemistry, and physics, as well as first-semester biochemistry, psychology, and sociology. While there aren’t specific courses you have to take to be able to register and take the exam, it’s important to feel comfortable with the content and skills tested. If you feel that additional coursework or studying is needed to help you prepare, think about testing at a later point in the year to have additional time. Consult your pre-health advisor or a faculty member to assist with course selection, as courses vary by institution.

 

Also keep in mind, medical schools will be able to see all of your scores and there are now limits on the number of times you can take the exam. See the MCAT Essentials for more information about releasing scores and lifetime limits.

 

If you need help deciding when to take the exam, check in with your pre-health advisor. Most importantly, take the exam when you’re ready, not when you think should be.

Are there required courses or pre-requisites I need to take before taking the MCAT exam?

All of the content on the MCAT is covered in introductory courses at most colleges and universities, including introductory biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, and first-semester psychology, sociology, and biochemistry. Research methods and statistics concepts on the exam are used in introductory science labs as well as introductory psychology and sociology courses. You are encouraged to reach out to the pre-health advisor at your institution who can help you determine the specific coursework you will need to meet your educational goals.

Are there required courses or pre-requisites I need to take before taking the MCAT exam?

All of the content on the MCAT is covered in introductory courses at most colleges and universities, including introductory biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, and first-semester psychology, sociology, and biochemistry. Research methods and statistics concepts on the exam are used in introductory science labs as well as introductory psychology and sociology courses. You are encouraged to reach out to the pre-health advisor at your institution who can help you determine the specific coursework you will need to meet your educational goals.

How often can I take the MCAT Exam?

In 2015, the AAMC implemented testing limits on how many times you can take the MCAT exam. Voids and no-shows count toward your lifetime limites. Remember that you can only be registered for one seat at a time.

Single testing year:

  • The MCAT exam can be taken up to three times.

Two consecutive-year period:

  • The MCAT exam can be taken up to four times.

Lifetime:

  • The MCAT exam can be taken up to seven times in a lifetime.

How often can I take the MCAT Exam?

In 2015, the AAMC implemented testing limits on how many times you can take the MCAT exam. Voids and no-shows count toward your lifetime limites. Remember that you can only be registered for one seat at a time.

Single testing year:

  • The MCAT exam can be taken up to three times.

Two consecutive-year period:

  • The MCAT exam can be taken up to four times.

Lifetime:

  • The MCAT exam can be taken up to seven times in a lifetime.

What does an optional break mean?

You can go on to the next section in the MCAT exam if you finish the previous section early, or if you want to skip one of the optional breaks.

 

The remaining time from a section you finished early or a skipped break will not carry over to the next section of the exam.

What does an optional break mean?

You can go on to the next section in the MCAT exam if you finish the previous section early, or if you want to skip one of the optional breaks.

 

The remaining time from a section you finished early or a skipped break will not carry over to the next section of the exam.

MCAT Registration FAQs

Can I see what seats are available without losing my current seat reservation?

Yes, you can!

Simply go back into the MCAT Registration System to view current seat availability. You won't lose your current seat until you submit payment for a new seat. Please keep in mind that additional fees will apply no matter when you choose to reschedule.

For more information about changing your exam test center or exam date, please see the MCAT Essentials.

Can I see what seats are available without losing my current seat reservation?

Yes, you can!

Simply go back into the MCAT Registration System to view current seat availability. You won't lose your current seat until you submit payment for a new seat. Please keep in mind that additional fees will apply no matter when you choose to reschedule.

For more information about changing your exam test center or exam date, please see the MCAT Essentials.

When is the last day that I can reschedule or cancel my MCAT exam date?

There are three scheduling zones for each exam date: Gold, Silver, and Bronze. For each exam date, Gold Zone scheduling fees are lower and flexibility is higher. Conversely, fees are higher and flexibility is limited in the Bronze Zone.

All deadlines for the Gold, Silver, and Bronze Zones occur a set number of days prior to the exam. All deadlines take effect at 7:59 am local, test center time. For example, if your MCAT exam is scheduled for August 9, 2018 in Los Angeles, California, your Bronze Zone Scheduling deadline is 7:59 AM PT on August 1, 2018. MCAT Scheduling Fees shows all fees and restrictions applicable to registering for this year’s MCAT exam.

When is the last day that I can reschedule or cancel my MCAT exam date?

There are three scheduling zones for each exam date: Gold, Silver, and Bronze. For each exam date, Gold Zone scheduling fees are lower and flexibility is higher. Conversely, fees are higher and flexibility is limited in the Bronze Zone.

All deadlines for the Gold, Silver, and Bronze Zones occur a set number of days prior to the exam. All deadlines take effect at 7:59 am local, test center time. For example, if your MCAT exam is scheduled for August 9, 2018 in Los Angeles, California, your Bronze Zone Scheduling deadline is 7:59 AM PT on August 1, 2018. MCAT Scheduling Fees shows all fees and restrictions applicable to registering for this year’s MCAT exam.

Can I get on a waitlist for a specific MCAT test date?

At this time, we don’t have a wait list available for registration. We recommend that you check the MCAT Registration System frequently, especially around registration deadlines and score release days. The system updates often to reflect what is available.

Can I get on a waitlist for a specific MCAT test date?

At this time, we don’t have a wait list available for registration. We recommend that you check the MCAT Registration System frequently, especially around registration deadlines and score release days. The system updates often to reflect what is available.

How long will I have to wait until I can retake the MCAT exam?

There is no defined waiting period between tests. However, you may only register for one MCAT testing session at a time, and you must wait 48 hours following your exam day to be able to register for a new seat.

How long will I have to wait until I can retake the MCAT exam?

There is no defined waiting period between tests. However, you may only register for one MCAT testing session at a time, and you must wait 48 hours following your exam day to be able to register for a new seat.

MCAT Test Preparation FAQs

When will new test preparation materials be available?

Practice Exam 3 will be available in mid-October and the Official Guide to the MCAT Exam, Fifth Edition will be avialable by end of 2017.

When will new test preparation materials be available?

Practice Exam 3 will be available in mid-October and the Official Guide to the MCAT Exam, Fifth Edition will be avialable by end of 2017.

Do I need to take a commercial MCAT review course?

Our data shows that roughly half of MCAT examinees report that they prepared for the exam without a review course, preferring self-study. However, some students do enroll in MCAT prep courses offered by commercial organizations. Others prefer to study using a course in a classroom setting.

The AAMC provides free and low-cost MCAT preparation materials to help you prepare regardless of the direction you choose.

Do I need to take a commercial MCAT review course?

Our data shows that roughly half of MCAT examinees report that they prepared for the exam without a review course, preferring self-study. However, some students do enroll in MCAT prep courses offered by commercial organizations. Others prefer to study using a course in a classroom setting.

The AAMC provides free and low-cost MCAT preparation materials to help you prepare regardless of the direction you choose.

MCAT Scores FAQs

How is the MCAT exam scored?

The MCAT exam is scaled and equated so that scores have the same meaning, no matter when you test.

 

The AAMC does multiple things when we score your exam.

  • First, we count the number of questions answered correctly. The scores that you achieve on the four scored multiple-choice sections are based on the number of questions you answer correctly. Wrong answers are scored exactly the same way as an unanswered question and there isn’t an additional penalty for wrong answers. 
  • Second, we take the number of correct answers and convert them to an MCAT scale score.  Scores from each of these four sections are converted to a scaled score ranging from 118 (lowest) to 132 (highest). For example, if your number correct on one of the sections is between 35 and 37, your converted score might be 123. Number correct ranging from 46 to 48 might have a converted score of 128, and so forth.

 

So why don’t we give you your raw score on test day or on your score report, and instead convert to scaled scores? In a given testing year, there are many different test forms administered, any one of which you could see on your exam day. The different forms of the exam are designed to measure the same basic concepts and skills, but each form contains different sets of questions. While care is taken to make sure that each form is about equivalent in difficulty, one form may be slightly more or less difficult than another. The conversion of number correct scores to scaled scores, through a process called equating, compensates for small variations in difficulty between sets of questions. The exact conversion of number correct to scaled scores is not constant because each conversion is tailored to the specific set of questions included on a test form.

 

The scaled score, reported on a 15-point scale, tends to provide a more stable and accurate assessment of a student’s performance than the number correct score. Two students with equal preparation who answered different sets of questions would be expected to get the same scaled score, even though there might be a slight difference between the number correct scores each student obtained on their test form. This is also done to ensure that scores have the same meaning across test administrations and testing years.

How is the MCAT exam scored?

The MCAT exam is scaled and equated so that scores have the same meaning, no matter when you test.

 

The AAMC does multiple things when we score your exam.

  • First, we count the number of questions answered correctly. The scores that you achieve on the four scored multiple-choice sections are based on the number of questions you answer correctly. Wrong answers are scored exactly the same way as an unanswered question and there isn’t an additional penalty for wrong answers. 
  • Second, we take the number of correct answers and convert them to an MCAT scale score.  Scores from each of these four sections are converted to a scaled score ranging from 118 (lowest) to 132 (highest). For example, if your number correct on one of the sections is between 35 and 37, your converted score might be 123. Number correct ranging from 46 to 48 might have a converted score of 128, and so forth.

 

So why don’t we give you your raw score on test day or on your score report, and instead convert to scaled scores? In a given testing year, there are many different test forms administered, any one of which you could see on your exam day. The different forms of the exam are designed to measure the same basic concepts and skills, but each form contains different sets of questions. While care is taken to make sure that each form is about equivalent in difficulty, one form may be slightly more or less difficult than another. The conversion of number correct scores to scaled scores, through a process called equating, compensates for small variations in difficulty between sets of questions. The exact conversion of number correct to scaled scores is not constant because each conversion is tailored to the specific set of questions included on a test form.

 

The scaled score, reported on a 15-point scale, tends to provide a more stable and accurate assessment of a student’s performance than the number correct score. Two students with equal preparation who answered different sets of questions would be expected to get the same scaled score, even though there might be a slight difference between the number correct scores each student obtained on their test form. This is also done to ensure that scores have the same meaning across test administrations and testing years.

Is the MCAT exam graded on a curve?

Test takers often ask if obtaining a high score is easier or harder at different times of the testing year, or, in other words, if the exam is scored on a curve.  For exams graded on a curve, a final score depends on how an individual performs in comparison to other test takers from the same test day or same time of year. 

The MCAT exam is not graded on a curve. Instead, the MCAT exam is scaled and equated so that scores have the same meaning, no matter when you test or who tests at the same time you did.

Although there may be small differences in the form of the MCAT exam you took compared to another examinee (because you answered different sets of questions), the scoring process accounts for these differences.  For example, a 124 earned on, the Critical Analysis and Reasoning section of one test form means the same thing as a 124 earned on that section on any other form.  How you score on the MCAT exam is not reflective of the particular form you took or the group of examinees you tested with—the test date or the time of year—since any difference in difficulty level is accounted for when calculating your scaled scores (see above for information about scaling).

Is the MCAT exam graded on a curve?

Test takers often ask if obtaining a high score is easier or harder at different times of the testing year, or, in other words, if the exam is scored on a curve.  For exams graded on a curve, a final score depends on how an individual performs in comparison to other test takers from the same test day or same time of year. 

The MCAT exam is not graded on a curve. Instead, the MCAT exam is scaled and equated so that scores have the same meaning, no matter when you test or who tests at the same time you did.

Although there may be small differences in the form of the MCAT exam you took compared to another examinee (because you answered different sets of questions), the scoring process accounts for these differences.  For example, a 124 earned on, the Critical Analysis and Reasoning section of one test form means the same thing as a 124 earned on that section on any other form.  How you score on the MCAT exam is not reflective of the particular form you took or the group of examinees you tested with—the test date or the time of year—since any difference in difficulty level is accounted for when calculating your scaled scores (see above for information about scaling).

How long does it take to receive MCAT scores?

Scores are released approximately 30-35 days after each test day. Please see the U.S. Testing Calendar, Scheduling Deadlines, and Score Release Dates for the release dates for each exam. Scores are released by 5 p.m. ET on release days.

 

AAMC scales and equates each exam after each test day.  This takes 30 to 35 days. The scaling and equating process is done to account for small differences in the difficulty of test questions when we convert the number of questions you answer correctly to the MCAT score scale. This time also allows students to submit any concerns they have about exam questions or testing conditions. The AAMC then reviews and investigates each concern. So, due to this careful analysis and review of feedback from each exam date, we aren’t able to provide a score immediately after you complete your exam.

 

For more information about how the MCAT exam is scored, please click here.

How long does it take to receive MCAT scores?

Scores are released approximately 30-35 days after each test day. Please see the U.S. Testing Calendar, Scheduling Deadlines, and Score Release Dates for the release dates for each exam. Scores are released by 5 p.m. ET on release days.

 

AAMC scales and equates each exam after each test day.  This takes 30 to 35 days. The scaling and equating process is done to account for small differences in the difficulty of test questions when we convert the number of questions you answer correctly to the MCAT score scale. This time also allows students to submit any concerns they have about exam questions or testing conditions. The AAMC then reviews and investigates each concern. So, due to this careful analysis and review of feedback from each exam date, we aren’t able to provide a score immediately after you complete your exam.

 

For more information about how the MCAT exam is scored, please click here.

How do I understand my percentile ranks?

The percentile ranks provided on your score report show the percentages of test takers who received the same scores or lower scores on the exam than you did.  They show how your scores compare to the scores of other examinees.

 

Every year on May 1, the percentile ranks are updated using data from one or more testing years.  These annual updates will ensure that the percentile ranks reflect current and stable information about your scores. This means that changes in percentile ranks from one year to another reflect meaningful changes in the scores of examinees, rather than year-to-year fluctuations.  Updating percentile ranks is consistent with industry practice. You can view the percentile ranks here.

 

The update schedule will be as follows:

  • On May 1 2017, the percentile ranks will be updated to include all exam results from the prior two years.   
  • On May 1, 2018, the percentile ranks will be updated to include all exam results from the prior three years.
  • After 2018 percentile ranks will include all exam results from the then three most recent years.

If you look at your scores in the Score Reporting System after May 1, 2017, you will see these percentile ranks. Please note that the updated percentile ranks are very similar to the percentile ranks in use from May 1, 2016 through April 30, 2017.

 

How do I understand my percentile ranks?

The percentile ranks provided on your score report show the percentages of test takers who received the same scores or lower scores on the exam than you did.  They show how your scores compare to the scores of other examinees.

 

Every year on May 1, the percentile ranks are updated using data from one or more testing years.  These annual updates will ensure that the percentile ranks reflect current and stable information about your scores. This means that changes in percentile ranks from one year to another reflect meaningful changes in the scores of examinees, rather than year-to-year fluctuations.  Updating percentile ranks is consistent with industry practice. You can view the percentile ranks here.

 

The update schedule will be as follows:

  • On May 1 2017, the percentile ranks will be updated to include all exam results from the prior two years.   
  • On May 1, 2018, the percentile ranks will be updated to include all exam results from the prior three years.
  • After 2018 percentile ranks will include all exam results from the then three most recent years.

If you look at your scores in the Score Reporting System after May 1, 2017, you will see these percentile ranks. Please note that the updated percentile ranks are very similar to the percentile ranks in use from May 1, 2016 through April 30, 2017.

 

Will medical schools know if I void my exam?

Medical schools do not have any record of exams which you chose to void or no-show, nor do they have the ability to access a system that shows them whether you voided or no-showed. Only you will have a record of these exams through the MCAT Score Reporting System. Medical schools only have access to the exams you chose to score. Remember, voids and no-shows count as an attempt toward your testing limits.

Will medical schools know if I void my exam?

Medical schools do not have any record of exams which you chose to void or no-show, nor do they have the ability to access a system that shows them whether you voided or no-showed. Only you will have a record of these exams through the MCAT Score Reporting System. Medical schools only have access to the exams you chose to score. Remember, voids and no-shows count as an attempt toward your testing limits.

How are multiple MCAT scores used?

According to a survey of medical school admissions officers, schools use multiple sets of MCAT scores in several ways:

  • Some schools weigh all sets of scores equally and note improvements.
  • Other schools consider only the most recent set of scores.
  • Still others take an average of all sets of scores.
  • Some schools use only the highest set of scores or the highest individual sections scores.

How are multiple MCAT scores used?

According to a survey of medical school admissions officers, schools use multiple sets of MCAT scores in several ways:

  • Some schools weigh all sets of scores equally and note improvements.
  • Other schools consider only the most recent set of scores.
  • Still others take an average of all sets of scores.
  • Some schools use only the highest set of scores or the highest individual sections scores.

How do I send my MCAT scores to non-AMCAS schools?

MCAT scores can be sent to non-AMCAS schools or programs in two ways:

  • Electronically through the Score Reporting System, or
  • Mailing a copy of your official score report.

For more detailed information, view the Help link within the MCAT Score Reporting System.

How do I send my MCAT scores to non-AMCAS schools?

MCAT scores can be sent to non-AMCAS schools or programs in two ways:

  • Electronically through the Score Reporting System, or
  • Mailing a copy of your official score report.

For more detailed information, view the Help link within the MCAT Score Reporting System.

Can I rescore my MCAT exam?

If you think that a scoring error has occurred, then you may request that your MCAT exam be rescored by hand.

 

You will receive the results of this rescoring in writing. The response letter will either confirm that your original scores were correct as reported, or inform you of the corrected scaled scores for each test section. Raw scores will not be disclosed.

 

For privacy and security reasons, the MCAT program and its independent reviewers do not disclose any information on score changes. However, scores may go up, down, or remain the same.

 

For more information, please refer to the MCAT Essentials

 

Note: If you have a 2014-January 2015 MCAT score, please follow the same instructions listed in the 2015 MCAT Essentials.

Can I rescore my MCAT exam?

If you think that a scoring error has occurred, then you may request that your MCAT exam be rescored by hand.

 

You will receive the results of this rescoring in writing. The response letter will either confirm that your original scores were correct as reported, or inform you of the corrected scaled scores for each test section. Raw scores will not be disclosed.

 

For privacy and security reasons, the MCAT program and its independent reviewers do not disclose any information on score changes. However, scores may go up, down, or remain the same.

 

For more information, please refer to the MCAT Essentials

 

Note: If you have a 2014-January 2015 MCAT score, please follow the same instructions listed in the 2015 MCAT Essentials.

If I took the MCAT exam prior to April 2015, how long can I submit my scores?

The AAMC will continue to report MCAT test scores from the 1991 version through the 2019 AMCAS application cycle. However, whether medical schools will continue to accept these scores through the 2019 AMCAS application cycle will depend on the individual medical school.

 

The AAMC conducted a survey about medical schools' policies for accepting scores from the prior version of the MCAT exam (administered from 1991 through January 2015). See the survey results:

If I took the MCAT exam prior to April 2015, how long can I submit my scores?

The AAMC will continue to report MCAT test scores from the 1991 version through the 2019 AMCAS application cycle. However, whether medical schools will continue to accept these scores through the 2019 AMCAS application cycle will depend on the individual medical school.

 

The AAMC conducted a survey about medical schools' policies for accepting scores from the prior version of the MCAT exam (administered from 1991 through January 2015). See the survey results:

Do you have statistics and data on MCAT examinees scores?

Yes, this information is reported annually. See MCAT Research and Data for more information.

Do you have statistics and data on MCAT examinees scores?

Yes, this information is reported annually. See MCAT Research and Data for more information.