5 Things to Know About the AAMC VITA Interview

There’s a lot of information to take-in about the new AAMC Video Interview Tool for Admissions (AAMC VITA™) program. For starters, read 5 important things you need to know.

The COVID-19 pandemic presents a number of obstacles to the medical school application process this year. Among those challenges: the ability to conduct typical face-to-face interviews between schools and prospective students.  

The AAMC Video Interview Tool for Admissions (AAMC VITA™)—launched in collaboration with AAMC member medical schools—will be used to supplement in-person interviews this year. There’s a lot to take-in about this new tool (and, unfortunately, a fair amount of misinformation floating around). 
 

  1. AAMC VITA was designed to complement the live interview process -- not replace it. Each participating medical school will determine how and at what stage it will incorporate the AAMC VITA interview into its application review process. Schools can refocus their in-person or live-virtual interviews on understanding how an applicant’s interest aligns with the school’s mission and devote more time to sharing information with applicants about the institution and surrounding area.
     
  2. As with in-person interviews, you must be invited by a medical school to complete the AAMC VITA interview. Applicants who are selected by at least one school to move forward in the application process will be asked to complete the interview, and they only need to complete it once. That same interview recording will be made available to all additional participating schools that request it from you. More information on the process can be found here. The list of participating schools is now available.
     
  3. There is no scoring, computerized assessment, or artificial intelligence technology involved. A video recording of your responses to standard questions are provided to medical school admissions staff without evaluation or assessment. As with in-person interviews, schools conduct their own evaluation of the responses within their holistic review process. You can find more information about what AAMC VITA measures and sample questions on the AAMC VITA website.
     
  4. If you can use Zoom, Skype, or other video platforms, you can complete the AAMC VITA interview. The technology requirements are similar to those of the live-video platforms that medical schools will be using in other stages of their interview and selection process. No special equipment is needed. The interview is on-demand—record it at a date and time that is convenient for you. Use resources developed by the AAMC to prepare for the AAMC VITA the same way you would prepare for an in-person interview; expert tips, sample questions, and a practice interview are also available. Additionally, we have just released our Prep for Success in Your Virtual Interview webinar, video and slides, on our website, so you will want to take a look at that, too!
     
  5. AAMC VITA was designed with all applicants in mind. Applicants who require accommodations can request them via the Request for Accommodations Form on the AAMC VITA website. The AAMC has taken steps to minimize the risk of bias within the AAMC VITA interview, including offering unconscious bias training to all medical school staff involved in the admissions process. 

 

Return to the AAMC VITA homepage.

Contact the AAMC VITA™ Program

AAMC Video Interview Tool for Admissions: Essentials for the 2021 Season

The official policy and procedure guide for the AAMC Video Interview Tool for Admissions.

Request an Accommodation

The AAMC is committed to ensuring that the AAMC Video Interview Tool for Admissions is accessible to persons with disabilities in accordance with relevant law.

Report a Technology Issue

The AAMC takes great care to ensure that the video interview technology functions properly. In the unlikely event that an error occurs, the AAMC will take reasonable measures to correct it. 

Participating Medical Schools

AAMC Video Interview Tool for Admissions (AAMC VITA™)—launched in collaboration with AAMC member medical schools—will be used by medical schools to supplement alternatives to in-person interviews this year.